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Judging Quality

So many bags, which one to choose? You want to buy a bag that will hold up to the way you travel. As you compare bags you should be comparing these points...

Fabric: The biggest difference in the quality of a bag lies in the fabric it is made of. Most bags are made from nylon, leather, or polyester. However, there are varieties of each:

Nylon: When talking about nylon, you will notice differences in the "denier" of the fabric. This is a reference to the thickness of the nylon threads in that fabric. The higher the denier, the more rugged the fabric woven from it. 2520 denier is the most durable nylon you will find. Many manufacturers have created names for their own specialized heavy variations. The toughest are Dupont, Ballistic, & Cordura. These heavy nylons are extremely hard to puncture or slash. In fact, the names come from their origins as layers in bulletproof clothing made for police. Lighter nylons are also strong and are often used for backpacks and duffels because of their flexibility and lightness. Most nylon bags are also treated with a sealant on the interior face of the fabric that helps to keep your garments protected and dry should the case get wet.

Leather: You will often see leather bags described as "Full-Grain" or "Top-Grain". These bags are made from the exterior hide rather than from split layers, and are very sturdy. Belting leather is thick leather often used in briefcases, attaches, and catalog cases. Luggage sewn from belting leather is stiff enough to stand alone without a frame. That thickness also lends it for use in the trim and piping of nylon bags.

Polyester: Polyester is the least durable of the 3 fabrics. Like nylon, you will notice differences in the "denier" of the fabric. The higher the denier, the more durable the fabric. Polyester bags are best suited for infrequent travelers.

Handles: Most upright cases are equipped with a push-button handle that locks in two positions. There are some variations. Some bags have a swivel handle that pivots and locks into a natural "palm-facing the body" rolling position, some handles have a Thermal Plastic Rubberized grip for comfort, some handles extend further to accomodate taller travelers, etc. But, for the most part, the handles are very similar and the difference in handles is going to be in the construction of the handle, which can best be determined by the reputation of the brand.

Wheeles: Most luggage manufacturers have adopted the rubber wheels originally created for in-line skates. They are quiet and wear like iron. Look for wheels that are slightly recessed into the frame of the bag, which helps reduce wear. Some bags are equipped with four, 360 degree rotation wheels for multi-directional rolling.

Zippers & Locks: Larger, oversized zippers and pulls tend to be sturdier and are great for a firm grip. You will notice some zippers being described as "self-healing". These zippers are made of interlocking nylon coils. If the halves of these "self-healing" zippers ever split apart from internal pressure, just sliding the pull back to the start will allow you to rejoin them. If you are concerned with securing the contents of your bag, look for a bag that comes with a TSA-approved lock and you won't have to worry about them cutting your lock at the airport!

If you need further assistance, don't hesitate to contact us! Our sales associates have been in this industry for years and would be happy to help you choose the right bag to suit your needs! Call us toll-free at 1-888-958-4424 or send us an email: sales@luggageonline.com

 

Luggage Terms Glossary

Are you running into some words that don't come up in everyday conversation? Between technical descriptions and marketing names, it can sometimes be hard to understand what each manufacturer is trying to tell you without a little help.

#10 zippers: Large coiling zippers with a well-deserved reputation for durability.

ABS: a durable plastic; used on football helmets, etc.

Add-a-bag: A method of connecting a non-wheeled bag to a wheeled bag.

Belting Leather: Thick leather of the type often used for belts. Very sturdy. Often used in briefcases and the trim on luggage.

Ballistic Cloth: Heavy nylon, originally created for use in bullet-proof vests. Very difficult to slash or puncture.

Cordura Nylon: Heavy nylon, originally created for use in bullet-proof vests. Very difficult to slash or puncture.

D-ring: metal ring used for attaching straps.

denier: a unit of measurement related to the thickness of a fabric fiber.

EVA: an especially lightweight foam.

Gussetted: The accordian-like folds on the sides of internal pockets in briefcases. Allows the pocket to snuggly hold large or small stacks of paper.

Hand Leather: Heavy leather taken from the outside of the hide. Very durable.

Hardware: Refers to the buckles, latches, zippers, etc. on the bag.

Key Lock: Locks often used on Pullman luggage. Click closed and lock with a key.

Napa leather: a smooth leather, first dyed in a vat of aniline, then colored with a light pigment that evens out the color and increases the durability of the leather.

Pullman: Also known as an Upright Case. The standard large suitcase-style case. These days almost all such cases have wheels on one end and a telescoping handle on the opposite end for pulling the case behind you.

PVC: a durable vinyl often used in upright frames and wetpaks.

Rollaboard: A Carry-On case with wheels.

Self-Repairing (Self-Healing) Zippers: Coiling zippers that are very durable, and will continue to function even if a few teeth are broken off.

Skid Plate: Metal or plastic plates attached to the exterior of some luggage to protect against abrasions.

Spinners: Wheeled luggage with 4 wheels that move in all directions, as opposed to the standard Pullman which has 2 inline wheels. Spinners allow you to easily pull your luggage with less resistance.

Suiter: An Upright Case/ Pullman with an internal compartment or hanger with padded bars that will hold suits, dresses and other garments in place when the bag is packed to reduce wrinkling.

TPR: "Thermal Plastic Rubberized" used on handle grips for comfort.

Tuck Lock: A lock that inserts a leather tab into a matching loop. Often used on the front of briefcases.

Turn Lock: Locks often used on Pullman luggage. Click closed and then turn a metal latch.

Upright Case: Also known as a Pullman. The standard large suitcase-style case. These days almost all such cases have wheels on one end and a telescoping handle on the opposite end for pulling the case behind you.

Wet Pack: An internal plastic compartment used to hold wet items such as gym clothes and wet bathing suits.

YKK Zippers: Large coiling zippers with a well-deserved reputation for durability.

 

Warranties

Every item sold at Luggage Online is covered by the manufacturer's warranty. The warranty length is listed on the product details page. For more details on specific warranties, you'll want to contact the manufacturer directly.

 

Repairs

Luggage Online does not perform repairs. If you find that your luggage requires service, you will need to contact the manufacturer to locate an authorized part/repair center in your area. If an authorized repair center is not available in your area, you will be given instructions on how to send your item(s) in for service. Repairs and service will be performed under the terms of the product warranty. Feel free to contact us if you have any questions or if you experience difficulty in obtaining repairs and service on items purchased from Luggage Online.

 

Replacement Parts

Luggage Online does not stock replacement parts for any of the merchandise that we sell. Contact the manufacturer in order to locate an authorized part/repair center in your area. Depending on the situation, they may be able to send you the parts for repair. In most cases, however, you will probably need to send the bag to the manufacturer or one of their authorized agents in order to receive parts and service. Parts will be replaced under the terms of the product warranty. Feel free to contact us if you have any questions or if you experience difficulty in obtaining parts and service for items purchased from Luggage Online.

 

Airline damaged luggage

If your bag is damaged by an airline, you should immediately file a damage claim with the airline. Most manufacturers' warranties do not cover abuse or mishandling. Contact the manufacturer directly for information on a specific product's warranty.

 

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